Sunday, 5 April 2015

A hike in the Scottish Highlands

In September 2014, two long time hiker friends, named Alec and Alistair, decided on the eighteenth to hike along a forest route in the Scottish Highlands. Eventually they had come to a cross road leading to two different routes. Alec wanted to take the road on the left while Alistair wanted to take the road on the right.

Not wanting to split up, the two began arguing over which way to go. Alec wanted to take the road on the left because the scenery described by some familiar Norwegian hikers from their hiking club intrigued his interest. Alistair argued for the road on the right, though you got to see less of the scenery of the countryside, it was the shorter and far less winding of the two routes and thus was the better choice due to this. Alec further argued that precisely because the road on the right was the shorter and less winding of the two routes, it was the more convenient route to take.

Eventually, to settle the matter, the two agreed on a coin toss, with left being heads as Alec was flipping the coin. Much to Alec's dismay, the coin had come up tails. Grudgingly on Alec's part, both friends proceeded with the road on the right but the scenery continued to intrigue him. Being reminded by Alistair that the coin toss was fair as there was an equal chance of either outcome winning, Alistair persisted that because tails won, the choice must be respected.

To the hikers that wanted to take the road on the left, accept that you might not win every coin toss, but the possibility always exists that you may win the next time and finally take the road on the left and experience the scenery of the countryside.

To the hikers that wanted to take the road on the right, you’ve won; the coin toss was for the road on the right. However, the hikers that take the road on the right go that way because it’s the shorter and less winding of the two routes, and therefore the more convenient choice for most. And if the scenery described by others is as beautiful as they claim, then it might just be worth taking the road on the left the next time.

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